SSB Radio and other progress, Quick trip home

Since Wednesday night (the last blog post summary at the boatyard), a lot has been accomplished at the boatyard. The install for the SSB radio is nearly complete. We are still waiting on the delivery of the ground plate – its supposed to arrive today (Monday). It’s really the most critical item at the boatyard since it has to be installed while the boat is out of the water. The ground plate requires two holes to be put in the hull so the bronze/brass bolts can be inserted through the holes and the plate can be placed under the boat (where it will always be in water).

On Thursday and Friday I spent part of the time installing the wire from the antenna to the tuner. This required drilling a hole in the top of the boat under the antenna, and fitting a special “clam” shell water-tight cable pass-thru around it. Then had to drill holes through three galley cabinets to get the cabinet to the tuner location. The big project was placing the template cut-outs and cutting holes in our nav station instrument panel to place the radio control box and speaker. The placement of the best locaction required a tricky jigsaw cut. Unfortunately, I neglected to place some cardboard on the desktop and was unaware until after the first cut that the jigsaw marred part of the desk surface. Argh! Not only that, but the angle of the cut was so high I managed to damage the jigsaw as well – oops. Finally, I had to finish the ground and counterpoise runs. John at RopeAntenna.com suggested I run one of the counterpoise lines across the salon to the other hull. It was a pain snaking it across, but I finally got it.

Here’s a shot of the new SSB radio at the console (added the microphone on the left after this photo was taken – also, the SSB is the one in the bottom-center and does not yet have the mount installed – so it is slightly crooked in the photo):

SSB Radio installed

In addition to the SSB, a lot of other progress was made.

We found out the washer/dryer is a much bigger job to install than I realized. The unit will have to be disassembled and the frame cut apart in order to get it into the cabinet where we plan to install. Got instructions and tips for how to install the washer from an expert in Florida with JustCatamarans who installed the one on Swingin on a Star (another St. Francis 50 just like Tahina).

We ordered the rigging hardware for the modifications we have planned.

The fiberglass cosmetic repairs have been mostly completed, he has a bit of polishing left which I expect will be finished today.

I spent most of Saturday morning cleaning up the boat both inside and out. Lots of dirty footprints on the back (a boatyard is a dirty place). After lunch I left to go home for a day. We had a social engagement on Sunday afternoon. It was nice to see Karen and visit with her a while. Although, I also had to spend a few hours finally cleaning my office at the house (the last room left). And, I took another truck-load to our storage shed. Sunday evening I drove back to the boatyard.

This week I hope to complete the bulk of the installations and test them as far as we can while in the boatyard (out of the water). Also, I will begin maintenance on the engines, cleaning the hulls, new anti-fouling paint, and waxing the boat. Hopefully I’ll be able to recruit more friends to help! Time to get back to work…

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2 Responses to SSB Radio and other progress, Quick trip home

  1. SC says:

    What’s the correct way to seal the ‘through hull’ holes? I imagine drilling through exposes the foam core to water.

    • Frank Taylor says:

      You use the same waterproof sealant you would use for any underwater operation. In Tahina’s case, she is pure thick fiberglass on the bottom of the hulls, no core. So, no it’s all about preventing water intrusion inside.

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